Archive for the ‘Trauma’ Category

DOES MY CLIENT HAVE TO DIE?

August 31, 2014

I have been invited to be on a panel when the American Criminology Society conference meets here in San Francisco the middle of November.  The panel’s title is Empowerment: The Resilience of Women in Various Crisis Situations.    I’ll be speaking about my client who is a domestic violence survivor.  She has not only survived the violence perpetrated on her by her now ex-spouse, she has also survived the emotional and mental  violence perpetrated on her by the very government agencies which are supposed to help and protect her. The actions of these agencies has caused her to constantly relapse into her PTSD symptoms as well as her Battered Wife Syndrome.

I’m sure that my client is not the only one to be suffering in this way.  I would be honored to hear from any of you who are willing to share your similar stories. or who have ideas on some of the actions needed to correct these egregious injustices.  There is power in numbers. Please call me at 415-474-6707 or email me at zkolkeymft@therapywithzora.com.

Warmly

Zora

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PRISONER TRAUMA, SOCIETAL IMPACT

June 6, 2011

The American Society of Criminology has accepted my proposal for a presentation on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder at their annual conference in November.  My abstract is below.  If you or someone you know would like to be a part of this, I encourage and invite you to get in touch with me.

PTSD:  INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE WALLS  

It took a very long time and a very difficult struggle by Vietnam Veterans to get Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) recognized as a serious and debilitating disorder. Eventually it was acknowledged that people suffering from other kinds of trauma and abuse – physical, emotional, sexual – could also display symptoms of PTSD. Only relatively recently are mental health professionals beginning to realize that incarceration and the variety of forms of institutional abuse that occurs within the prison setting can lead to someone suffering from PTSD. The purpose of this paper is to explore further the connection between PTSD and institutional as well as post-release behavior. A variety of recommendations for the treatment needs of those with PTSD along with policy considerations will be presented.

 

Thanks for reading this.  I would love to hear from you–any questions, comments, feedback.  All would be welcome.                                        Warmly,                                                                                        Zora